Introducing Fisheries Law at Harvard

Posted By on Aug 3, 2015 | 3 comments


 

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Introducing Fisheries Law at Harvard

 

On August 1, 2015 I started my Visiting Scholar appointment at East Asian Legal Studies Center at Harvard Law School. It is not only a great honour to be invited; it is a great opportunity for us at FLC to discuss the issues facing small-scale fisheries across the world.

 

At Harvard, one of the ways I plan to drive awareness and engagement is to initiate a series of seminars that facilitate meaningful discussions and build dialogue between scholars, students and small-scale and family fishers. These seminars will explore how to solidify and enrich the relationships between stakeholders over time, in hope that some Harvard law students and scholars will work to support coastal communities through their advocacy and hence reduce an access to justice gap that is prevalent in coastal and fishing communities.

 

Although these seminars will have a legal focus, they will familiarize participants with an overview of the multifarious discipline of fisheries. The project will involve cross-campus collaboration to examine the interrelations between law, economics, anthropology and many other disciplines.

 

The objective of these seminars is the dissemination of information on issues facing our fisheries/ fisher-folks and information on Fisheries Law itself as an emerging academic discipline. Example of upcoming seminars include seminars on climate change and fisheries, fisheries governance, the right to protest in the High Seas, the human rights approach to fisheries management, occupational hazards and fishers safety, seafood safety and traceability among other topics.

 

I encourage you to follow these activities on our blog.

 

Adam Soliman

3 Comments

  1. An excellent initiative. I hope you will also refer to the new Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries endorsed last year by FAO member countries

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    • Audun: certainly! The FAO’s SSF Voluntary Guidelines is core to the Human Rights approach to fisheries management movement. I’ll be inviting guest speakers from FAO to participate in the Human Right seminar. Thank you very much for the contribution. Thanks. Adam

      Post a Reply
  2. I’m looking forward to following issues here. particularly those of aquaculture, zoning the seas, and what rights the family fishing boats retain in this movement.

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